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History

The history department at Celbridge Community School not only teaches students about events of the past, or how society has developed through changes in politics, science, religion, war or societal issues. It equips its student with the skills and educational tools to develop their literacy and numeracy abilities. It teaches its students to communicate to a very high standard, to be creative and to work with others in a shared learning environment which is inclusive and encouraging and in turn nurtures and promotes the wellbeing of all the students who pass through its doors. It is the belief of the History Department that History has the capacity to change student’s viewpoints and assumptions about the world that they live in.  To this end the History department will place a strong emphasis on exposing students to stimulus material that will encourage them to become critical thinkers.

Building the learning power of students is a pillar of the teaching and learning system in the history class room. Building Learning Power fosters the development of a growth mindset which ensures that students understand that intelligence can be developed. This is an important skill in History. For example, a willingness to engage with new ideas and to acquire and try new things e.g. writing people in history stories, in class presentations and role play/ Drama. Enabling students to become independent and reflective learners, to analyse information and to evaluate its place in the order of history. Active teaching methodologies are utilised throughout all lessons in an effort to ensure student engagement and participation. Innovative use of ICT is a mainstay of lessons through which students learn how to create presentations, chronologically order information and to present their findings and conclusions.

What Skills will students learn in the history class?

Students will

* Acquire knowledge of and understanding about human activity in the past.

* Understand the contemporary world through the study of the past.

* Develop conceptual understanding and the ability to think independently.

* Develop a range of skills essential for the study of history.

* be encouraged to develop positive attitudes such as a commitment to objectivity and fairness, and an acceptance that people and events must be judged in the context of their values and time.

* be encouraged to develop an interest and enthusiasm for history and a value of their heritage from the past.

The aims of the subject of history in Celbridge Community School are:

  • To develop historical skills and historical thinking through the evaluation of evidence and the methodology of research.
  • To emphasise the need to look at history from different perspectives.
  • To examine and explain how new forces emerged and how they changed the societies in which they operated.
  • To emphasise the importance of history as investigation into available evidence.
  • Acquire knowledge of and understanding about human activity in the past.
  • Understand the contemporary world through the study of the past.
  • Develop conceptual understanding and the ability to think independently.
  • Develop a range of skills essential for the study of history.
  • To promote and emphasise positive attitudes such as a commitment to objectivity and fairness, and an acceptance that people and events must be judged in the context of their values and time.
  • To encourage and promote an interest and enthusiasm for history and a value of their heritage from the past.

Subject Objectives:

  • Through our schemes of work to create a structured emphasis on social, political, economic, cultural, religious and scientific developments.
  • Through our subject plans to create a structured balance between width of coverage and in depth study.
  • To create an emphasis on research skills through Transition Year Projects and Portfolio and the Leaving Certificate Project.
  • To promote history as primary subject of importance to those students with an interest in selecting the subject for senior cycle and for further education at third level.

The skills students will obtain through the study of history will be to

Develop the skills essential towards the research and writing of history. They should learn to:

  1. Locate historical information from a variety of sources, e.g.
    1. Primary and secondary written sources
    2. Statistics
    3. Visual materials
    4. Artefacts, buildings, settlements and other material sources
    5. Orally transmitted information
  2. Select relevant information to answer historical questions
  3. Record this information, e.g. by note-taking, categorising, summarising etc.
  4. Examine critically this information, e.g. distinguish between fact and fiction, detect deficiencies such as gaps, inconsistencies and bias
  5. Synthesise, e.g. assemble in logical sequence, follow a line of argument, offer explanations
  6. Present and communicate in a variety of ways, e.g. written, graphic and oral

Attitudes towards history

The teaching/learning of History should be informed throughout by the procedural values of the historian: students should therefore develop the disposition

  1. To be thorough in the collecting and accurate in the recording of historical information.
  2. To accept that individuals and events must be understood in their historical context.
  3. To ensure that historical narrative is consistent with the evidence while recognising that the available evidence may be open to more than one valid interpretation.
  4. To recognise that historical knowledge is tentative and incomplete and therefore subject to revision or reinterpretation in the light of new evidence and/or insights.

Teaching Methodologies in the History Department

Teachers may use all or some of the following:

  • Aidhm an Ranga shared at the start of the lesson
  • Use of success criteria for homework and classwork
  • Peer teaching
  • Group Work
  • Discussion (pair, group, whole class; groups and pairs grouped by ability to ensure those who may be weaker will have an opportunity to learn for those who are stronger in a particular area)
  • Oral presentation
  • Flow charts
  • Drama
  • Computer, data projector
  • Internet
  • YouTube
  • Dramatic presentation
  • Debate
  • Active methodologies

Cross curricular links

  • Link with CSPE in the study of racism
  • Link with English re modern drama, persuasive speaking and techniques, war poetry particularly with WWI
  • Link with geography – maps, locations

Assessment and the History Department

Assessment will test the extent to which students can demonstrate the following:

Knowledge and understanding of:

  • The principal trends, issues and events specified in the syllabus
  • The influence of and interaction between individuals and
  • institutions in the historical periods specified
  • The nature and use of historical sources
  • The procedural concepts listed in the syllabus
  • The general and specific substantive concepts listed in the syllabus

Students will acquire the ability to:

  1. Recall historical information relating to the above in its chronological setting
  2. Use historical terms
  3. Use and interpret information from a variety of sources, including
    1. Primary and secondary written sources
    2. Statistics
    3. Visual material
    4. Artefacts, buildings, settlements and other material sources
    5. Orally transmitted information
    6. Select relevant information to answer historical questions
    7. Examine critically historical information, e.g. distinguish fact from opinion, detect such deficiencies as gaps, inconsistencies and bias
    8. Synthesise information, e.g. assemble in logical sequence, follow a line of argument, offer explanations
    9. Present and communicate information and ideas in a variety of ways, including written, graphic and oral
    10. Apply their understanding of the historical concepts and procedures in dealing with historical issues

Structure of the history syllabus in Celbridge Community School

Framework

The syllabus from 1st to third year is divided into three sections

Section 1 How we find out about the past?

  • Introduction
  • Our roots in ancient civilisation
  • Castle, church and city
  • Renaissance

Section II Studies of change

  • Exploration
  • Reformation
  • Plantation in Ireland
  • Revolutionary movements
  • From farm to factory

Section III Understanding the modern world

  • Political developments in Ireland in the late 19th Century and the 20th Century
  • Social change in the 20th century
  • International relations in the 20th century

Teacher may use all or some of the following when assessing learning:

  • Summative and formative assessment
  • Assessment for learning; shared learning objective, criteria for success re homework
  • Modelling of rote learning and study techniques
  • Access to marking scheme-with a view to peer marking being established as a norm
  • Model answers for students, sample answers, read aloud  high standard work
  • Open and closed questioning
  • Assess learning via role play, dialogue, collection of homework and written texts
  • Formal assessments October, December, February and May
  • Daily oral questioning in class, in which students may become actively engaged in their own learning through individual or group problem solving.
  • Written class tests at the end of a chapter or series of chapters under a particular topic.
  • Evaluation of copies